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and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts and we are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but let me assure you we continue to work with t
? >> the special representative for afghanistan and pakistan leads our overall policy efforts ande are supporting his efforts, ambassador grossman's efforts, to develop all of the different elements of our policies. >> tried to get him here but couldn't. >> okay. so, in other words, you aren't in a position really to answer my question? is that what you're saying? >> yes, senator. i would defer to the special representatives office. >> then would you since the question is to you would you get me a written answer to the question? >> i will, sir. >> thank you. mr. harrigan, what are dea's plans for continued operations should military forces draw down to levels that would not allow adequate support for your operations? >> well, again, co-chairman grassley, i have been in discussions really for the last 18 months with my counter part at the podium here, mr. wechsler, as well as our regional director in afghanistan with the u.s. military and si isaf forces. dea has no intention of drawing down any of our 81 personnel. it would be a bit premature to see right now how the drawdown will impact dea but l
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
scandal. and a year after floods devastated pakistan, we talk to the man in charge of the u.n. relief operation. it is 9:00 a.m. and singapore. >> it is 2:00 a.m. in london, broadcasting on pbs in america and around the world, this is "newsday." >>> hello and welcome. rebel leaders in that libya say their military leader, general younes, has been shot dead. the head of the council said he was killed by an armed gang after he was recalled from the front to appear before a judicial committee. >> for many years, younes was firmly at colonel gaddafi's side. when the conflict broke out in february, he was one of the first high-profile figures to defect. though he became the man who led the note rebels' military against colonel gaddafi, it seems he was never fully trusted by the insurgents. some suggest that his presence spearheading their efforts to topple the government deeply uncomfortable. nor was he ever given by the gaddafi inner circle. either way, his death has come under strange circumstances. the chairman of the national transitional council said that general younes was shot short
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
aid to pakistan. they're with holding it, expelling military trainers and they hope holidaying back all that money will make pakistan crack down harder on militants and terrorists. what's the best way to describe the relationship with pakistan right now? >> they've been an important ally in the fight on terrorism, they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on aid which we have give on the their military and we're trying to work through that. it's a complicated relationship in a difficult part of the world. >>> and here's a figure for you. $37 billion. according to them, that much money could vanish this year from pockets. two out of ten dollars americans took in came in the form of money from government and when those extended benefits go away by the end of the year, some $37 billion onto go into people's accounts and hence won't go into the economy. let e let's go to kristie lu stout for your morning hit from hong kong. christy good morning. >> good morning, ali. >> it begins after hours markets c
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
into jens, the best intelligence we've gotten since tora bora that he was in abbottabad pakistan, we acted yuan laal ratly and took h out and appropriately so. we do work through the united nations in a variety of places in order, like on the sanctions regimes, on iran and north korea. but we have, as i said at the outset, really undertake aggressively... you know, the first triple trip obama... president obama tk outside the united states was in april, 2009 was to europe for a set of sum rk teixeiras and then to turkey. and understanding that these rising powers, these relationships are important for problem solving, particularly in a place like the middle east. we have had disagreements with the turks over the last three years. >> rose: what are those disagreements? >> we had a disagreement with the turks over tactics around the iranian sanctions resolution. and they thought... >> rose: this is turkey and brazil together because of their response? >> yes. and we... >> rose: they thought they were doing your bidding, you understand that? >> i understand a lot about it. and... but, in fact
across the border in afghanistan, officials in pakistan say at least 40 people have been killed and dozens injured in suspected you estrone attacks. the strikes targeted the northwestern tribal belt close to the border. missiles hit a vehicle and a compound. hours later, in the south, another area was hit. the death toll could rise. moody's causing more turmoil in europe today. "just when you think the situation is under control, there comes the next blow. the rating agencies moody's has cut ireland's bonds to junk status and has warned a further downgrade. it has been a fallevolatile day. stocks rebounded after six days of losses. the whole euros own is jittery. the leaders are talking about holding a crisis meeting to fight the contagion. -- the whole eurozone is jittery. >> this is one of the top rating institutions in europe. they ended the day up almost 6%. the european traders were panicking that the debt crisis might be spreading to italy. many put the blame on the politicians. >> there has been a discussion going on for days now and the eu itself is to blame by expressin
officials, pakistan and afghanistan will be on everybody's mind. delhi is worried about security this is a subject that those two countries have never comprehensively addressed with each other. unless they can reach some accommodation on their conflicting interests and indeed suspicions in afghanistan, there will be no regional compact piece for afghanistan. >> but beyond just afghanistan >>óqptf@& working together and do business together. $1.3 trillion economy is a big market for the utah and there lots of talk about investment opportunities during mrs. clinton's visit. >> you're watching "newsday." still to come on the program, the aid agency that had controversy by handing out less aid in uganda. >> and murdoch and sons prepare to answer questions about phone hacking corruption. we assess the future of news corp. south africans have celebrated former president's nelson mandela 93rd birthday. he spent the day with family in his home village where he was also visited by the president. millions of school children sang him a special birthday song before lessons began. >> smiling
that have fallen -- followed the killing of osama bin laden in pakistan and the more recent mumbai attacks that have again refocused indian attention on terrorism. but terrorism is an issue which is not exactly an issue of full convergence between the u.s. and india. there are differences between the countries. when hillary clinton discusses this issue with her indian counterpart, there will certainly be differences that will need to be sorted out. >> very briefly, tell us how america's approach to india changed with the rise of china. this is something you've written about. >> china is an important factor, but not one that is publicly discussed. but it is a subtext in the u.s.- india relationship. china becomes more and more assertive as it picks territorial fights with india and its other neighbors, and also begins to exert its influence in the south china sea, claiming the south china sea to be part of its historical borders and thereby infringing on u.s. interests in that seat. there is great room for u.s. and indian collaboration in insuring peace, stability, and more in asia. >> we w
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
, pakistan or egypt. and the two questions that i have, how many connections have there been -- convictions have there been over the last several years, do you have any -- and how many occasions do you know where the american embassy has advocated for these cases? generally, when there's a problem, members go to the embassy, they advocate it. how many times has the american embassy participate and been involved in any different cases? >> thank you very much, mr. wolf. there have been, in the 50 cases i was involved with personally, there were two investigations, neither investigation resulted in any legal process, so there are no convictions, um, resulting as of, as of complaints to the effective kidnappings, forced marriages and forced converses of coptic christian women. to my knowledge, also, and according to my research the u.s. embassy has not advocated on behalf of these women. >> one last thing, mr. chairman. as you have this record, i urge you to send it to leon panetta. our military has a very good relationship, in fact, as i think our military has a better relationship and more cl
or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going to run their government. this is something you can't avoid. when the figures for you don't put other dictators in you can put into place the basic institutions and procedures. >> host: he turned back from these issues in the news of the intellectual argument that the core of your book which is a very cha
or iran today or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from beginning to sell the idea of a two-state solution and they're all within this september of an international state system and we're going in the wrong direction. >> what i see on the ground and i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, you have an incredibly competent military but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor governance that the afghanistan paid and the institutions provide. and so we're pushing businesses to walk uphill and we never get there and i'm sure you -- it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's governance. >> that's true, too. but good governance brings us back to something like the democratization, something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture -- but it's going to be something the people will have a way to control, to change those who are going to run their governments. and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators fall, you have put in place the basic institutions and procedures for getting responsive gov
in afghanistan, pakistan, yemen. and i urge this subcommittee to let somalia to guide your policy on somalia rather than any other country. >> i echo my colleagues sentiments. to answer your question, i think we need to look at not only the threat that emanates from there, which does affect our way of life, the freedoms that we enjoy, commerce, threats to navigation, the very real threat irrespective of how are when they got there, the fact that al shabaab has been possible to other terrorist movements and extremist groups allowing them to operate in somalia creating a hodgepodge of characters gathered there, introducing them to reach other, including introducing them to the 30 americans with european and australian passports that of now gone through. for all of those reasons, we need to be concerned. we need to be concerned because we take for granted the areas in somalia and it is not the chaos that we imagine, but south central areas mainly where the conflict is. as the ambassador said earlier, it has been one of the most democratic states in the region. they have its problems, some of wh
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
in vietnam, and a lot of the ways of the fight now, the india- pakistan war which defines what is going on in the subcontinent now. even at the end of his career and of his life, 1994, he was still in the game. he was still thinking strategically, and to him, the cold war, the effects of the cold war still were not over. he was concerned about russia, and his thesis was communism is dead in warsaw, but democracy has not yet won, and for that reason he was traveling back and forth to russia, worried about whether gorbachev or yeltsin was speaking on that topic. he got a call from president clinton, they had a conservation -- conversation about clinton's russia policy, and you could see how his policy changed along with the advice that was given by richard nixon. as i see it, that is the essence of the man. i would like to conclude by going back to senator dole's look cheap. he talks about the last sign he saw president nixon, at a luncheon held in the capital honoring the 25th anniversary of his first inaugural. president nixon stood and delivered a speech, capturing the global seen as o
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)